finalproblem:

Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House is one of the fanciest dollhouses in the world. The house has electricity, running water, and a library containing hundreds of tiny books.

One of the volumes in the library is How Watson Learned the Trick. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the story into the tiny book by hand in 1922. It’s only 503 words long, but took up 34 pages.

It begins:

Watson had been watching his companion intently ever since he had sat down to the breakfast table. Holmes happened to look up and catch his eye.

"Well, Watson, what are you thinking about?" he asked.

"About you."

"Me?"

"Yes, Holmes. I was thinking how superficial are these tricks of yours, and how wonderful it is that the public should continue to show interest in them."

Read the rest of the story here.

(via beradan)

dduane:

princehal9000:

winstons-and-enochs:

the guardian imagines what historical figures might look like today. my personal favourite is shakespeare, reincarnated as a shoreditch hipster.

but can you imagine how’d he’d sound a loft party? 
“I’m going to subvert the whole, like, narrative ideal by telling you upfront that these two, like, teenagers are going to fall in love and die, and then do it. So there’s no more hiding in the words. Stark, yeah? And then, I think I’ll hide a sonnet in their big scene together, right? It’ll be subversive, because only, you know, people who are up on sonnets will get it…..what? No, she’s thirteen—a little edgy but that’s art, man. Art.”

(snicker)

dduane:

princehal9000:

winstons-and-enochs:

the guardian imagines what historical figures might look like today. my personal favourite is shakespeare, reincarnated as a shoreditch hipster.

but can you imagine how’d he’d sound a loft party? 

“I’m going to subvert the whole, like, narrative ideal by telling you upfront that these two, like, teenagers are going to fall in love and die, and then do it. So there’s no more hiding in the words. Stark, yeah? And then, I think I’ll hide a sonnet in their big scene together, right? It’ll be subversive, because only, you know, people who are up on sonnets will get it…..what? No, she’s thirteen—a little edgy but that’s art, man. Art.”

(snicker)

(via alpacamyhedgehog)

shadyoaks:

one of my favorite fashion history things ever is court dress during the regency era

When ladies (and gentlemen) appeared at Court on formal occasions they were required to wear Court Dress, which was a very formal, very specific type of garment that was not worn anywhere else. Rules of Court Dress were rigid and dictated by the current monarch or his Queen. During the Regency, those rules produced a type of female garment that appears perfectly ridiculous to modern eyes, but which was taken quite seriously by those who wore them and by the designers who made them.

The rules of Court directed that ladies should wear skirts with hoops and trains, and that white ostrich feathers be worn in the hair, attached to lappets which hung below the shoulders. These rules had been in place long before George III took the throne. In his predecessor’s day the skirts were enhanced with panniers that stood out very wide on either side, but leaving the front and back flat. The intent of such odd-looking dresses was to display a broad swath of beautifully embroidered fabric, some of which had pictorial or floral scenes that used the entire front of the skirt as a canvas.

Side panniers had been replaced by normal round hoops by the time George III came to the throne in 1760. In the last decade of the 18th century, the fashion for wide skirts began to evolve into the slim, vertical line associated with Regency dress. Queen Charlotte, however, held firm on the rules of Court Dress, and ladies were forced to adapt those rules to the current style, which produced a very odd-looking garment with the high-waist under the bosom and a full hoped skirt.

image

IT’S THE SILLIEST THING AND I LOVE IT

(via tiny-librarian)

erikkwakkel:

Selfie of drunk medieval decorator
This is an unusual image, in more than one sense of the word: it is a rare example of a selfie made by a person who decorated medieval books; and he is drinking on the job. Check out other selfies from medieval times - and the story behind them - in my new blog post: Medieval Selfies.
Pic: Stuttgart, Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Cod. mus. I 2 65 (dated 1512).

erikkwakkel:

Selfie of drunk medieval decorator

This is an unusual image, in more than one sense of the word: it is a rare example of a selfie made by a person who decorated medieval books; and he is drinking on the job. Check out other selfies from medieval times - and the story behind them - in my new blog post: Medieval Selfies.

Pic: Stuttgart, Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Cod. mus. I 2 65 (dated 1512).